Therapeutic Parenting Strategies for specific behaviours, utilising the P.A.C.E. model

The P.A.C.E. model, which stands for Playfulness, Acceptance, Curiosity, and Empathy, is a useful framework for therapeutic parenting. Here are some strategies for specific behaviours that can be applied within this model:

Aggression:

Playfulness: Use humour to help diffuse the situation. Make silly faces or use a funny voice to lighten the mood. Play music with a big beat!

Acceptance: Understand the experiences the child or young person has been through and how that impacts on the present. Acknowledge that the child and young person is feeling angry or upset. Let them know that their feelings are valid.

Curiosity: Wonder aloud in the presence of the child or young person guessing what is making them feel angry or upset. Try to understand the root cause of their behaviour.

Empathy: Show the child or young person that you understand how they are feeling. Validate their emotions and help them find more appropriate ways to express themselves.

Anxiety:

Playfulness: Use calming activities, such as deep breathing or meditation, to help the child or young person relax.

Acceptance: Acknowledge that the child and young person is feeling anxious. Let them know that it's okay to feel this way.

Curiosity: Wonder aloud in the presence of the child or young person about what you think might be causing their anxiety. Try to understand what triggers their anxiety.

Empathy: Show the child or young person that you understand how they are feeling. Validate their emotions and help them find coping strategies, such as talking to a therapist or using relaxation techniques.

Disruptive behaviour:

Playfulness: Use humour to redirect the child or young person's behaviour. Try to make them laugh or engage them in a fun activity.

Acceptance: Acknowledge the child or young person's behaviour without judging them. Let them know that you are there to help them.

Curiosity: Wonder aloud in the presence of the child or young person about what they might need to calm down. Try to understand what is causing their behaviour.

Empathy: Show the child or young person that you understand how they are feeling. Validate their emotions and help them find more appropriate ways to express themselves.

Low self-esteem:

Playfulness: Use positive affirmations or engaging activities to help boost the child or young person's self-esteem.

Acceptance: Acknowledge the child or young person's feelings of low self-esteem. Let them know that it's normal to feel this way sometimes.

Curiosity: Wonder aloud in the presence of the child or young person, about what they are good at and what they enjoy doing. Help them find activities that make them feel confident.

Empathy: Show the child or young person that you understand how they are feeling. Validate their emotions and help them build self-esteem by recognizing their strengths and accomplishments.

Remember that the P.A.C.E. model is about building a relationship of trust and safety with the child or young person. By using these strategies you can help the child or young person feel heard, understood, and supported, which can lead to better behaviour and emotional regulation over time.


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